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How Will My Second Job Be Taxed?

By: J.A.J Aaronson - Updated: 20 Apr 2018 | comments*Discuss
 
Tax Second Job Tax Code Income National

Q.

If you have two jobs, does the second job get taxed more at all, even if the salary of both jobs combined is less than 34k?

(Mr M.Y., 16 March 2011)

A.

Many people seem to think that second jobs are taxed at a higher rate. We have previously received questions regarding the tax treatment of a part-time job if the worker is drawing a private pension (see Is It Worth Taking a Part-Time Job On A Pension?), and much the same principle applies in your case. There is no separate rate of tax for a second job, although this is likely to affect your non-taxable personal allowances, and your tax code.

Non-taxable Personal Allowance

In the first instance, it is important to note that you have one non-taxable personal allowance per year, regardless of the number of jobs you have. For the 2018-19 tax year, this is set at £11,850 if you are under 65 years old. This non-taxable allowance will apply to just one of your jobs. As such, you will probably receive your allowance on your first job, meaning that the first £11,850 earned from this source will be free from tax. However, once you have used that allowance, all other income will be taxed at the normal rate.

Earnings Threshold

You have mentioned that your combined salary is less than £34,000. For the 2018-19 tax year, the earnings threshold for the basic tax bracket is £46,351. As such, if your total income is less than this, it will all attract income tax at a rate of 20% for this tax year. You should also remember that you will almost certainly be liable for National Insurance Contributions, which will be paid at a rate of 12% for annual earnings between £8,424 and £46,350.

Finally, you are likely to find that your tax code changes if you take on a second job. If you will continue to be a basic rate tax payer, your code will change to BR for ‘basic rate’, and will continue to be followed by a number that outlines the way in which your income is taxed. For more information on understanding your tax code, you may wish to read What Is My Tax Code?

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[Add a Comment]
If i work two jobs. 16 hours each in both. How does my tax situation work? Im currently working 16 hours and soon will start a second job at 16 hours also. But i will still earn less than the £11,500 a year.
B - 20-Apr-18 @ 11:43 PM
Ruthy - Your Question:
I have in the past had two zero hour contract job but I’m now starting job in April where I’m going to have salary of £15K but I’m is still keeping one of my zero hour contract job which I’m looking to earn around £4000 extra a year since you mention above about on job going to have a tax free allowance could I request that my salary job can receive the tax free allowance as this wil be my main job

Our Response:
Yes. Generally the salaried job is considered the main job to which your annual personal allowance is attributed. Your second job (your zero hours job) would be taxed at a straight 20%.
TheTaxGuide - 19-Apr-18 @ 11:23 AM
V c- Your Question:
I’ve got a full time job and a second job On my second job I work 10 hrs a week Do I pay tax on the second job

Our Response:
You will pay tax at 20% on your second job if you earn over £11,850 on your first and second job combined.
TheTaxGuide - 19-Apr-18 @ 10:43 AM
I’ve got a full time job and a second job On my second job I work 10 hrs a week Do I pay tax on the second job
V c - 18-Apr-18 @ 5:57 PM
I have in the past had two zero hour contract job but I’m now starting job in April where I’m going to have salary of £15K but I’m is still keeping one of my zero hour contract job which I’m looking to earn around £4000 extra a year since you mention above about on job going to have a tax free allowance could I request that my salary job can receive the tax free allowance as this wil be my main job
Ruthy - 18-Apr-18 @ 1:31 AM
anney - Your Question:
I have 2 part time jobs.both jobs pay me under my allowance for tax but I am paying a br tax code on second job and none on my first.can I put both jobs under my tax allowance? Therefore not having to pay any tax.

Our Response:
You would have to contact HMRC directly regarding this matter if you are earning less than £11,500 across the two jobs.
TheTaxGuide - 16-Apr-18 @ 2:59 PM
George - Your Question:
Hi , I have a full time job were I earn 20.000-21.000 £ per year. my tax code is 1150L W1/M1. I want to take a second job were I will earn 6000-7000 £ the tax for this will be 20%. What I want to know is , after , my first tax code he will change as well or will be the same 1150L W1/M1?Thank you!

Our Response:
You are likely to be given a basic rate (BR) tax code if you have a second job. The BR tax code means that you will pay 20% tax on all of your earnings from your second job.
TheTaxGuide - 16-Apr-18 @ 11:13 AM
Hi , I have a full time job were I earn 20.000-21.000 £ per year . my tax code is 1150L W1/M1 . I want to take a secondjob were I will earn 6000-7000 £ the tax for this will be 20%. What I want to know is , after , my first tax code he will change as well or will be the same 1150L W1/M1? Thank you!
George - 15-Apr-18 @ 7:08 PM
I have 2 part time jobs. ....both jobs pay me under my allowance for tax but I am paying a br tax code on second job and none on my first........can I put both jobs under my tax allowance? Therefore not having to pay any tax.
anney - 14-Apr-18 @ 7:51 AM
Ellis123 - Your Question:
Hi, I've been asked if I would do some work in the coming months, the job would pay 850 a throughout the yr this would be a second income to my current full-time job earning 28kplus. Please can someone advise how legally this needs to be declared if I decided to take up the offer.Thanks

Our Response:
If you decide to take up the offer and you are working PAYE, then your employer will inform HMRC who will change your tax code accordingly. If you are working self-epmloyed you would need to register via gov.uk for self-assessment.
TheTaxGuide - 13-Apr-18 @ 11:11 AM
Hi, I've been asked if I would do some work in the coming months, the job would pay 850 a throughout the yr this would be a second income to my current full-time job earning 28kplus . Please can someone advise how legally this needs to be declared if I decided to take up the offer. Thanks
Ellis123 - 12-Apr-18 @ 2:10 PM
Swagdog - Your Question:
I have a job that earns £1,127.97 a month (or £13535.64 a year) before the tax man has his bit, I am getting another job at the same time that earns about £4425.60 a year and my tax code is 1150L how will this be taxed?

Our Response:
As mentioned in the article, your main salaried job will carry your annual personal allowance, so that once you have earned over £11,850 you will be taxed on the remainder. Your second job will be taxed at a straight 20%.
TheTaxGuide - 10-Apr-18 @ 3:10 PM
I have a job that earns £1,127.97 a month (or £13535.64 a year) before the tax man has his bit, I am getting another job at the same time that earns about £4425.60 a year and my tax code is 1150L how will this be taxed?
Swagdog - 10-Apr-18 @ 10:57 AM
Kay- Your Question:
I have job earning 7k n want to tske on another job payin 3k my tax allowance is 1190 will I pay tax at 20% still on 2nd job

Our Response:
You will not pay tax on either job until you earn over £11,850 for the year 2018/19.
TheTaxGuide - 10-Apr-18 @ 10:46 AM
I have job earning 7k n want to tske on another job payin 3k my tax allowance is 1190 will i pay tax at 20% still on 2nd job
Kay - 9-Apr-18 @ 3:03 PM
Claus - Your Question:
Hi.i am full time employed with my first job. I get around £15,600 per year with this job,I want to get a second job but only as a bank staff so I will be working only few hours a months depends on how many hours will be there available for me. How much will I be taxed for the second job? Thank you for any help.Kind regards

Our Response:
You will be taxed a straight 20% on your second job. Your annual personal tax allowance of £11,850 will be attributed to your main job.
TheTaxGuide - 5-Apr-18 @ 11:08 AM
Hi.i am full time employed with my first job. I get around £15,600 per year with this job,I want to get a second job but only as a bank staff so I will be working only few hours a months depends on how many hours will be there available for me. How much will I be taxed for the second job? Thank you for any help. Kind regards
Claus - 4-Apr-18 @ 2:48 PM
I have 2 job and my new tax code is 11850ljob 1 earns me £8000 a year Job 2 earns me£ 6400 how will it affect my tax and in how much will i be paying is the remainder of my tax free allowance transferable to job 2
lowlow - 30-Mar-18 @ 1:53 PM
Hi I have 2 jobs ,should the tax code on my first job be 1150 on my wage slip and BR on my other ???...my main job currently has a tax code of 226 ??
San - 30-Mar-18 @ 12:10 AM
@ Bogdan - Once you earn over£45,001 you'll be pushed into the 40% tax instead of 20%. It depends on how much you want the extra money and if you're prepared to take the hit.
ColM - 27-Mar-18 @ 1:36 PM
Hi ,I have 1 job where I am.paid £40000 Gross/year , but I want to take a weekend job part time where I will be paid £6000 gross / year. How will be calculated my tax ? Is worth to take this second job ? Where I will pay much tax? Please advise me.Many thanks in advance.
Bogdan - 26-Mar-18 @ 10:43 PM
Boo - Your Question:
I have two jobs but still earn under £11000 per year. Will I get taxed?

Our Response:
You will not get taxed until you earn over £11,500, (or £11,850 from April 1).
TheTaxGuide - 26-Mar-18 @ 3:03 PM
I have two jobs but still earn under£11000 per year. Will I get taxed?
Boo - 25-Mar-18 @ 10:53 PM
I’m considering a 2nd job, My main job pays £28000 and the second job £20000 . I’m confused how much tax I’ll pay.
Murdy - 25-Mar-18 @ 8:55 AM
lk3 - Your Question:
Hi job 1 pays me £6,250 a year and I have just taken on a second job and I will earn £6,500 and my tax code is 1150l how much take will I pay

Our Response:
The minimum personal annual tax allowance is due to change to £11,850 in April. Currently, if you were earning on the 2017/18 allowance of £11,500 you would pay £248 income tax and £550 in National Insurance across the year. You will pay less tax in the 2018/2019 tax year in line with the new personal allowance.
TheTaxGuide - 20-Mar-18 @ 2:09 PM
Hi job 1 pays me £6,250 a year and i have just taken on a second job and i will earn £6,500 and my tax code is 1150l how much take will i pay
lk3 - 16-Mar-18 @ 9:31 PM
Hi My tax code is 1150L. Which option will tax me more? 1: Do One job and get 23000 a year Or 2:Do 2 jobs get 23000 a year (11500 each). Is the tax man will tax me more because i work for 2 companies even though i will be earning the same amount as if i was working with one company? Please let me understand this puzzle. Kind regards
Zalmai - 9-Mar-18 @ 3:22 PM
Esther - Your Question:
Hi I get paid £7262 in my first job and I then took the second job which pays 8850. How much tax should I be paying? And my tax code for the second job is 1150L CUM. Thanks in advance.

Our Response:
You should pay £921 per year tax approximately (across 2017/2018).
TheTaxGuide - 8-Mar-18 @ 2:15 PM
Hi I get paid £7262 in my first job and I then took the second job which pays 8850. How much tax should I be paying? And my tax code for the second job is 1150L CUM. Thanks in advance.
Esther - 7-Mar-18 @ 7:12 AM
i have two jobs but i'm concerned I am not paying enough tax. My main job pays £45,000 and the second pays £6400/year. How much tax should I expect to pay on my second job as at present I am not paying any and have had two rebates. I am concerned I will get a large bill.
Clampit222 - 2-Mar-18 @ 5:21 PM
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